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Centennial of the end of the First World War: The World Remembers project

Friday, September 14, 2018 9:46 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

It was an international project produced by Canadian actor and playwright, R.H. Thomson and a non-profit organisation It’s called “The World Remembers”.

Each centennial year of the war, the war dead have been remembered by projecting their names onto a huge screen.

In the national capital Ottawa, the screen was set up on the convention centre, which had been the main railway station during the war through which many soldiers passed on the way to the front, many of whom never returned.

This year is even more poignant as the centennial of the last year of the war.

The names of the fallen in 1918 from Canada will be projected along with those of United Kingdom,, France, Germany, the United States, Turkey, Belgium, Australia, the Czech Republic, Ukraine, South Africa, Italy, New Zealand, Slovenia, China and the former British Indian Army will appear.

The projection will start at dusk each night starting tonight, and run throughout the night till early dawn and this year will also include the names of those who died as a result of their war wounds or disease in later years from 1919 to 1922.

The names of more than 23,000 Canadian dead will be shown along with almost 980,000 others of the participating countries.

In addition to the Ottawa Convention Centre, other Canadian locations include, The Canadian War Museum (also in Ottawa), The Manitoba Museum, the City of Toronto, the City of Winnipeg, the Royal Military College, Queen’s University, Trinity College Toronto, Royal BC Museum, Cape Breton University, Concordia University and Carleton University, the display will also appear in Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom, the United States and Switzerland. Canadian Embassies in Washington and Geneva and the High Commission in London UK have confirmed their participation.

The names will appear in no particular order as the feeling was there was no order to the deaths.

The last name however will be that of Canadian George Price, believed to be the last death at 2 minutes before 11am when the Armistice came into effect ending the war.

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